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Benjamin Eglinton 1796 - 1881
Chemist & Druggist - Convict
Also known whilst in Tasmania & Australia as
James Benjamin Eglinton

Below is a very intriguing family story, a story which still leaves quite a few unanswered questions. Benjamin is the main player here, we know he was born in Belgium in about 1796 but at this time we have no idea who his parents were and what they were doing there. From all accounts he was an educated and professional man who either through greed or just being unlucky stepped out of line with the law in 1844. This was a time when there was little mercy shown to criminals and punishment was severe. Your fate, if you escaped death, was to be ripped away from your family and transported to the other side of the world. Many did not come back although Benjamin did return, but not before starting a new family there and for reasons unknown he then deserted them and life there and returned to England. In those days life was hard and later in the research we find Benjamin's Australian daughter suffered a sad and tragic death when it appeared she suffered rejection.

As metioned this page tells Benjamin's and his descendants story taken from the information gathered todate - As Benjamin is an ancestor of my brother in-law I have shown the ancestral line from Benjamin to him. This has not been an easy family to trace but working with my brother in-law's niece, Kirsty has been a great advantage as she has shared her findings and supplied many documents to confirm links which otherwise would have been difficult to substantiate.

From Benjamin the family line goes as follows - here are some quick links: William Eglinton 1826 - William James Eglinton 1851 - Lawrence Edward Eglinton about 1880.

Note: The two people below are all part of the same line of research....
Mark Brooker - Sentenced to death for stealing a roll of linen - reprieved to transported for life
Matilda Martha Simmons - Free person, Emigrated to Tasmainia - one of many single woman of marriage age to help balance out the population of the then Colony.

BENJAMIN EGLINTON born about 1796 - Chemist, Druggist - Convict
Son of uknown and unknown

Benjamin Eglinton born about 1796 at BRUGES BELGIUM
Apparently according to a record, brought up in Plymouth - However we have no idea who his parents were and why they happened to be in Belgium.

Benjamin could have had a brother Samuel Eglington born in 1788 at Belgium. This Samuel married Sarah Derbyshire in 1814. Samuel and Sarah's first daughter Mary Ann, was baptised on September 5th 1815, a second daughter Sarah, baptised on November 29th 1818, a son Jospeh, baptised on Dec 9th 1821 and third daughter Maria, baptised January 9th 1822. In the 1841 census Samuel age 52 and Sarah, 51 were living at Lower Wick Lane Hackney, about 3 miles from where Benjamin was in Primrose Street. With them was a Harriet Eglington age 18, a dressmaker. From records Samuel never had a daughter called Harriet but Benjamin did, as Harriet's age fits Benjamin's daughter, is this her staying with her uncle? In the 1851 census Samuel had his daughter Mary Ann living with him, she had married William Earl in 1838, Samuel was now a widow aged 72, he is also now blind and still living at Wicks Lane. By 1861 Samuel together with his daughter's family had moved to 10 Kings Road Hackney.
If Samuel is Benjamin's brother it tells us their parents lived in Belgium between the years 1788 - 1796. What occupation or position did they have?

From Belgium records (still under construction) there was a Laurent Samuel Eglington born December 26th 1788 at St Gillis Brugge, the son of Joseph and Sara Eglington. This appears to be the Samuel above. Joseph and Sara also had a son Joseph who died on January 6th 1790 - where they also Benjamin's parents? - No further information at present?

Note:
Just throwing this into the research as it could fit!!

Could this be Joseph and Sara/Sarah's marriage??
1786: Jan 1 - Marriage at All Saints Church Hertford - Find my Past
Joseph Eglington bachelor of St John married Sarah Eglington (same name) spinster of All Saints and St John's - both signed
Next to Joseph's signature looks like 'Jnr' and in another place, in brackets, 'Broker'

Another fact which is of interest.....
1754:
Mar 15 - Baptism at the parish of South Mimms, Middlesex - about 13 miles from All Saints, St John's
Joseph son of Joseph Eglington anf his wife Mary - Find my Past

There was much unrest in Belgium during this time, Belgian Revolution of 1789–90 was only part of it - Was Benjamin's father a teacher or connected to the Colleges of St Omer, Bruges and Liège - were they part of the below.....

Brugge, Belgium
In 1793, the French Revolution and the United Kingdom declaration of war to France ended the Saint Omer College. The English faculty and students were imprisoned until February 1795. English penal laws and related discrimination had changed regarding Catholic education, so when released, some of the staff and most of the then about 100 students went to England, in order to avoid war on the European continent. A former student, Thomas Weld, donated a mansion and grounds at Stonyhurst, in Lancashire. The modern school, Stonyhurst College continues to this day as a direct lineal descendant of the College of Saint-Omer.

Benjamin Eglinton claimed to be a Chemist and Druggist by trade but no record has been found to prove this or where he gained his qualifications, that's if he had any! The article below make us ask this question - In his court case (below) in 1844, Benjamin is stated as keeping a Chandler's shop in Blossom-Street, Norton-Falgate London - previous to this in 1832 in what appears to be baptism of a daughter, Elizabeth, his trade is records as 'Tallow Chandler.' The definition of a Chandler is 'One that makes or sells candles' and 'A dealer in nautical supplies' - this needs further investigation.

MUSEUM OF THE ROYAL PHARMACEUTICAL SOCIETY
Early history and foundation - In the early 1800s, some chemists and druggists had already worked collectively to protect the profession’s interests. They successfully argued for an exemption from the Apothecaries Act of 1815, formed a committee to monitor the progress of a proposed Sale of Poisons Bill in 1819, and created a short-lived General Association of Chemists and Druggists to promote protection against the Medicine Stamp Duty Act. In 1841, a group of chemists and druggists convened a public meeting in London to discuss a proposed medical reform bill. Although this bill failed at its second reading, the trade felt vulnerable. It was unregulated and unrestricted. Anyone could operate under the title of Chemist and/or Druggist.
http://www.rpharms.com/about-us/history-of-the-society.asp

The first record we have of Benjamin is this his first marriage
1817:
Sep 28 - Marriage record at St Pride Fleet Street London - Find my Past
Benjamin Eglington married Elizabeth Jones
From his transportation notes we are told Benjamin had 3 children although there are records which disputes this as there are records that appear to show he had five with his first wife, Elizabeth and three with Sophia his second., although her name is different.
We know there was a William born about 1826 as on William's marriage certificate in 1850 to Mary Cope his father is recorded as Benjamin Eglinton a Chemist also a witness named James Eglington which could have been Benjamin and Elizabeth's first child.

This is what a search for baptism's and deaths records have revealed with, Father: Benjamin and Mother: Elizabeth.....

1819: Jul 11 - Baptism at Shorditch London - Find my Past
James Eglington son of Benjamin Eglington and his wife Elizabeth
In 1851 James age 32 and single was a Portman at the 'Coopers Arms' Miles Lane off St Michael Crooked Lane, London, working for the Inn Keeper George Kempton. In the Jun quarter of 1853 James married Mary Ann Nixon in London City (1c 235). James and Mary have not been found in the 1861 census, however their two childen (below) were staying with their grand-father, Benjamin Eglinton who had returned from Australia and his second wife Sophia
James died in 1867 age 48 and was buried on August 12th at Hackney, Victoria Park Cemetery (N
on-Comformist) - Find my Past

1854: Birth record – James William Eglington at London – Jun quarter (1c 74)
1854: Dec 24 - Baptism at London - Find my Past
James William Eglington son of James Eglington anf his wife Mary Ann

1855: Birth record – Mary Ann Ellen Elington at London – Dec quarter (1c 70)
1855: Dec 9 - Baptism at London - Find my Past
Mary Ann Eglington daughter of James Eglington anf his wife Mary Ann

1821: Jul 22 - Baptism at Newington Surry - This may not fit in - needs further investigation
Benjamin Eglington son of Benjamin Eglinton and his wife Elizabeth - Find my Past
There is a record that a Benjamin Eglington age 10 months died in 1822 and was buried on April 20th at the Bunhill Fields Burial Grounds on City Road London - family Dissenters. This burial ground also appears in the next record of Elizabeth.
However there is also a Benjamin Eglinton who turns up in 1871 age 49 and living at Whitmore Road St Leonards Shoreditch, occupation, 'Man's Agent' born at Belgium - Is this Benjamin, connected as it seems odd Belgium is mentioned as his birth place, or is his age wrong! - The is no further mention of this Benjamin!.

1823: Sep 7 - Baptism at Shorditch London - Find my Past
Elizabeth Matilda Eglington daughter of Benjamin Eglington and his wife Elizabeth
Possible twin with Harriet below or maybe born a year earlier.

Elizabeth Eglington of Radcliff Row died age 2 and was buried on March 13th 1825 , Bunhill Field, Burial Ground, City Road London - a Dissenter (non conformist)

1823: Sep 7 - Baptism at Shoreditch London - Find my Past
Harriet Eglington daughter of Benjamin Eglington and his wife Elizabeth - Possible twin with Elizabeth above
In 1841 Harriet appears to be staying with her uncle Samuel Eglington and his wife Sarah, no record of Samuel having a daughter by the name of Harriet born in the same year (1823) has been found - so was this Benjamin's daughter.

1826: William Eglington would fit in here although there is no baptism record. – ANCESTRAL LINE
We see in 1825 on the record of his sister's burial (Elizabeth) there was a note to say the family were Dissenters. Maybe William was baptised by the Non-Conformists in another church - the search goes on

MORE on William Eglinton born about 1826
Son of Benjamin Eglinton and Elizabeth Jones

No baptism record found

1850: Marriage record – William Eglinton married Mary Cope at London – Dec quarter (2 162)
1850: Oct 27 - Marriage at Christ Church Greyfriars Newgate,London – Entry 139
William Eglinton Bachelor and Licence Victualler of King William Street married Mary Cope Spinster
Fathers: Benjamin Eglinton Chemist and William Cope labourer
Witness: James Eglinton (brother) and Sophia Eglinton

Mary was one of 13 children, she was the daughter of Thomas Cope a Farm Labour of Winslade Bassingstoke and his wife Sarah
William and Mary had children:

MORE on William Eglinton 1826 and family profile click HERE

 

Benjamin's wife, Elizabeth died
1830:
Dec 19 - Burial at St Giles Cripplegate Church London - Find my Past
Elizabeth Eglington of Paul's Alley London age 37 (1793)

Benjamin remarried, he would have been now about 35
1831: Sep 11 - Marriage record at London - Find my Past
Benjamin Eglington married Sophia Wilkinson

The following children were found which seem to relate to Benjamin although his wife is Elizabeth!! - on a search of the 1841 census there is only one Benjamin Eglinton - are they the same and for some reason Sophia was known as Elizabeth?
1832:
Sep 30 - Baptism at Whitechapel Church High Street London
Elizabeth Eglinton born July 23rd 1832 daughter of Benjamin Eglinton a Tallow Chadler of High Street and his wife Elizaberth!!!
This appears to be Benjamin but his wife is named as Elizabeth!

1835: Mar 29 - Baptism at Holburn London
John George Eglinton born 1834 son of Benjamin Eglinton and his wife Eliza
No records have been found to John George however there is a death record for a George Eglinton age 45 in the Dec quarter of 1879 in London City and as no birth record can be found for a George are they one of the same.

1836: - Sophia Eglinton - No baptism record found
We know from census records Benjamin and Sophia also had a daughter Sophia born about 1836 at Spitalfields, Middlesex - Although no birth/baptism record has been found - Their daughter Sophia married John Scalett in the Sep quarter of 1863. In 1871 there were living at 187 Whitechapel and staying with them was Sophia's mother who was now 75, Her father, Benjamin is not found in the census. The 1881 census shows Sophia's husband (John) was a Coffee House Keeper at 9 Beresford Street Newington London. In the 1911 census the couple were living at an eight room property, 99 High Road London, they state they had had 6 children 4 of which were still living.

1841: Census - Primrose Street St Botolph Without Bishopsgate London
Benjamin Eglinton – age 40 1801 – Chemist – not of this county
Sophia Eglinton – age 40 1801 – not of this county
Sophia Eglinton – age 5 1836 - Middlesex, England
Looks like a shared building with this family….
Sophia Miller – age 20 – could be servant? - Middlesex, England
Francis King – age 45 – Tailor - Middlesex, England
Elizabeth King – age 45 - Middlesex, England
Robert King – age 20 – Carpenter - Middlesex, England
Francis King – age 15 - Middlesex, England
Elizabeth King – age 12 - Middlesex, England

Benjamin was accused of receiving stolen goods
1844: Apr 08 - Central Criminal Court, London
Benjamin Eglinton
Crime: Receiving Stolen Goods
Receiving stolen patent Medicines – Freemans Ointments tried with Peter Jordon on Board, Jordan knew nothing about it, pr Mr Sharwood.
Sentence: 7 years transportation.

COURT CASE

Its a bit confusing as there seems to have been two trials (first above link) the first both Bemjamin and Jordon where found 'Not Guilty'
Case: 1269 -
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=def2-1269-18440408&div=t18440408-1269#highlight

The second is what we are mainly interested in (link below)
https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18440408-1312-punishment-228&div=t18440408-1312

Case: 1312 - WILLIAM PERRY was indicted for stealing 12 boxes of patent medicine, called Dr. Freeman's Never-failing Ointment for the Itch, value 9s. 6d.; and 12 other boxes of ointment, 9s. 6d.; 3 boxes of Scots' pills, 2s. 5d.; 2 pots of honey-cream, 2s.; 2 gally-pots, 6d.; 6 bottles of Medicamentum Gratia Probatum, 3s.; and 6 bottles of Dutch drops, 3s.; the goods of William Henry Sutton and another, his masters: and BENJAMIN EGLINTON and PETER JORDAN for feloniously receiving part of the same, knowing them to have been stolen; against the Statute, &c.

MR. WILDE conducted the Prosecution.
CHARLES THAIN (City police-constable, No. 19.)
I know the three prisoners. Perry lives in George-street, Shoreditch, Eglinton keeps a chandler's shop in Blossom-street, Norton-falgate, Jordan lives in Staralley, Fenchurch-street—I have seen Jordan and Eglinton together frequently— about a quarter past one o'clock, on the 11th of March, I saw Jordan leave his house in Star-alley, and go up White Lion-street, Norton-falgate—Eglinton was standing at the corner of White Lion-street—Jordan passed by him without taking the least notice of him—I had seen them together before that day, at Eglinton's house—Jordan turned up Blossom-street and went into Eglinton's house—at the time Jordan passed Eglinton he pointed his hand along White Lion-street, and Perry was crossing from the City of London Theatre—I should say he could see Eglinton when he was crossing—Eglinton went into a public-house, and Perry directly after him—that was all I saw that day—about one o'clock, on the 19th of March, I saw Perry leave Bow Church-yard, where the pro-secutor's warehouse is—I followed him to the Black Dog in Long-alley, Moorfields—he went in at a sort of private entrance they call the "bottle department"—he remained there nearly five minutes, and came out with Eglinton—they parted in Crown-street, and Perry went along Long-alley—on the 23rd I saw Perry leave Bow Church-yard, about twenty-five minutes past eight o'clock in the morning—I followed him down Bow-lane—he went into a coffeeshop in Great St. Thomas the Apostle—he afterwards came out and went down Garlick-hill—I continued having my eye on the coffee-shop in Great St. Thomas the Apostle—I saw Eglinton come out of the same coffee¬house and go towards his house—I went to the Plough, in Plough-yard, Shore-ditch—after I had been there a little while Perry came in and went into the tap-room—she remained in a few minutes, and then Eglinton came out, and then Perry—they parted about the door-way—I then went after Eglinton and took him—I told him I was a City of London policeman, I should take him for receiving stolen property belonging to Mr. Sutton, of Bow Church¬yard, from Perry the porter to the firm—he said, "I never received any stolen property that I am aware of, or yet to my knowledge"—I searched the house, No. 9, Star-alley, Fenchurch-street (I had seen Jordan go in and come out of that house on several occasions) I found three boxes of Scots' pills with this writing on them as it is now, "William Sutton and Son, late Dicey and Son, Bow Church-yard."

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. What was the charge on the other indictment that has been tried? A. Perry was charged with stealing—I cannot say on what day—I did not indict them—I gave evidence on the 11th, 19th, and 20th of March—I only proved the connexion—I mentioned Monday, the 11th of March last, as the day the theft was committed—Eglinton's warehouse is rather better than a mile from Bow Church-yard, where the things were stolen from. (See paye945.)

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. You did not interfere with Jordan at all? A. No—I did not examine his coat to see if he had an inside-pocket—I do not believe be had—I have been a policeman nine or ten years—I cannot say whether you have a pocket in your coat-tail inside—the parcel was placed right up his back.

SAMUEL COOMBS (policeman.) On the 19th of March I sow Jordan and Eglinton together—I took Perry into custody.

JAMBS ALLAN SHARWOOD , druggist, 58, Bishopsgate-st. I have known the prisoner Jordan many years by name—I have bought things of him—I have bought patent medicines of him—on the 20th of March last I gave him orders for a dozen of each ointment—on Friday the 21st of March, at half-past nine in the morning, he brought me this dozen of patent-medicine—he asked me 8s. for it, which I paid—that was under the usual price—I had a reason for purchasing at a reduced price, as I had communicated with Messrs. Sutton, and I bought them—9s. 6d., was the proper price—I had bought another dozen of him the day previous—I had also purchased half-a-dozen on the 19th—I had refused that half-dozen on the Saturday previous—there is a mark on it—I marked it at half-past nine on the 21st of March—I received these from Jordan in the month of January—it was the last of the patent ointment that he could supply—he stated that he could sell them at less than the regular price.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Did you give evidence on a previous charge of receiving stolen property? A. Yes—I had no reason to doubt that he was carrying on a respectable business in the chemist and drug-gist line—I know that he has been acting as a seller of patent medicine on commission—I never saw him at a sale—I have purchased things of him, according to his representation, just after a sale—patent medicines are not gene-rally sold—there are spurious patent medicines—you do not always get the right article—there was no concealment about Jordan in any of the transactions—I never heard any thing against his character—the difference between the price Messrs. Sutton sell it at, and what I paid was 18d., on the twelve boxes.

WILLIAM COLLINS . In March last, I was in the employ of William Henry Sutton and Son—I remember marking some medicines on Sunday the 17th of March—they were kept in a box in the cellar—at ten minutes past eight o'clock, on Thursday, the 21st of March, I saw them in the cellar—I saw Perry there that morning—he is a porter in their employ—the latest time I saw him come out of the cellar was about twenty-five minutes past eight—I cannot speak positively—he left altogether at twenty minutes to nine—all the men went out to breakfast—I saw him go out—I did not look outside the door—directly after he left I went down into the cellar, and missed one dozen—I know this ointment by these marks—I know Eglinton by sight—I had never seen him at our house—I have seen him in the neighbourhood, in Bow-lane—I did not see him on my master's premises on the morning of the 21st—I cannot say whether we have any real patent for these medicines—I do not know of any.

COURT. Q. You saw Perry come out of the cellar, had any body else been in the cellar that morning? A. Yes, James Jarman, one of the young men—I cannot be positive whether it was before or after—he is not here—he went down when I saw the things safe.

JAMES GELLATLY (City policeman.) I know Eglinton and Perry—I have seen them together at the Plough, Plough-yard. Shoreditch—I saw them there on Wednesday the 20th of March, at half-past eight o'clock in the evening—Perry came to the door and looked in—the pot-boy said. "He is not here yet"—he then went away, returned in three or four minutes, sat down and called for a pint of beer and a pipe—Eglinton came in, and said to Perry, "I have a dozen more ordered; it is strange, it is not, that they should be wanted, for last week the parties would not look at them, much more buy"—Perry said, "Between this and Saturday"—Eglinton said, "The parties are in a hurry for them"—they soon after left—I heard nothing more that night—I was there on the next evening, Thursday the 21st, the day in question, in plain clothes—I saw them both sitting there—I heard Eglinton say to Perry, "Anything to-night?"—Perry said, "No"—they were soon after joined by a man and lad, and all four left—on Saturday, the 23rd of March, I apprehended Jordan coming from Eglinton's house—I said, "I am one of the City police, I take you into custody charged with receiving stolen goods knowing them to be stolen, belonging to Messrs. Sutton and Co."—he said, "You must be mistaken; I know Sutton and Dicey well, and have laid out hundreds of pounds with them; I will give you my address, Nicholas-street, Hoxton, and No. 9, Star-alley, Fenchurch-street, where I sleep"—he said he might be found when wanted—I told him he must come with me—he said, "Young man, listen to me, and I will be a father to you"—I told him I had no desire to hear any thing he had to say—he said he had a relation in a dying state who he wished to see, and if I wanted 5l. at any time I could have it—I told him I could not listen to any such proposal, he must come to Moor-lane station—he said, "Very well"—on our road he said he had known Eglinton for years—I had not mentioned Eglinton to him—I said, "I have not mentioned any name"—he said, "No, I thought you saw me come out of his house"—he said, Saturday being a busy day it would inconvenience him a good deal, but he would go to Sutton's if I liked.

Cross-examined by MR. BALLANTINE. Q. How long have you been a police constable? A. Since the 16th of February—I am twenty-two years old—before I went into the police I was servant to Mr. Stevens, a solicitor, in Queen-street, Cheapside—I get 17s. a week—if my conduct is approved of I shall get a higher salary—I shall be promoted in the event of giving satisfaction—I do not expect to get up after this, not for six months—I took a memorandum of the conversation the same evening, about half an hour afterwards—I have it here—I was not desired to bring it with me—I was asked for it the last time—I took it down from recollection—I have referred to it pretty often since—I do not know that it is put down in the order that it passed—I do not know that the words exactly follow each other in the order I have told you to-day—I was put there to watch—I did not take the memorandum the first day, because I did not think of it—I did not put it down for the purpose of reference, but to refresh my memory—the pot-boy was here this morning.

Cross-examined by MB. PAYNE. Q. Did not Jordan say, being in his work-day dress, he should like to change it? A. Yes. I said he could not—he said, "I have known Eglinton for years, and have sold drugs for him on commission"—he might have seen me when he came out of the shop—I saw him come out of the shop at half-past three o'clock in the afternoon, and I took him—two of the prisoners had a hearing on Monday—Jordan was examined on Monday morning—it was in the street he said he would go to Sutton's if I liked—he appeared very indignant at the charge—he talked very fast and loud—I have not discovered that he told me a single falsehood—I have never inquired whether the places of residence are correct—he did not make any attempt to escape—he was going the contrary way till I turned him round—he did not fight me—he talked so fast I cannot remember all he said—I never heard any body say that he had a relative in a dying state—he said so himself before the Alderman—I will not swear he did not say he thought it strange Messrs. Sutton had not ascertained the loss instead of taking him prisoner—he spoke about the 5l. directly after saying he had a relative in a dying state.

MR. BALLANTINE. Q. Have you ever shown this paper to any body? A. No—I did not mention the conversation to any body except the Magistrate.

Jordan. It was my own daughter that was dying; that was the reason I offered him 5l.
GEORGE JONES . I am manager to Messrs. Sutton. I never saw Jordan before—if he had been in the habit of buying patent medicines at our place I must have known him—patent medicines are never sold at a reduction.

Cross-examined by MR. PAYNE. Q. Do you know Mr. Jordan who formerly carried on a large business in Whitechapel? A.No.—I cannot swear he has not done business with our house twenty-five years ago—I never heard till the last week or two that he was a large chemist and druggist in Whitechapel—I have been in the business eighteen years, and can only speak to that time—I will not swear he did not carry on business in Whitechapel.

(Joseph Low, goldsmith and jeweller; Francis King, tavern-keeper; Alfred; and Richard Divine, chemist and druggist, No. 76, Aldersgate-street; gave Eglinton a good character.)

(Thomas Williams, tobacconist, No. 87, Blackman-street, Borough; Samuel Cheshire, chemist and druggist, No. 144, Whitechapel; Samuel James Stokes, New North-road; and Henry Cook, cook and confectioner, No. 9, Star-street, Fenchurch-street; gave Jordan a good character.)

PERRY — GUILTY . Aged 40.—Recommended to mercy by the Prosecutors.
Confined One Year.
EGLINTON — GUILTY . Aged 45
JORDAN — GUILTY . Aged 49.
Transported for Seven Years

1844: Jul 13 – Benjamin Eglinton - Departed from London for Van Diemens’s Land – Travelled with 243 other prisoners.
In the Tasmanian convict records it states his departures was July 20th 1844 and 242 other prisoners
Name: Benjamin Eglinton
Ship: Lord Auckland
Ships Master: Robert Brown
Ships Surgeon: John J Lancaster
Sailed for: 122 days
Prisoner’s age: 46 – 1798
Eyes: Blue
Hair: Brown
Height: 5ft 7¼ inches
Body Marks: Nearly bald, mole on right arm below elbow, mole on back of neck
Family: Married - 3 children
Literacy: Can read and write
Religion: Protestant
Trade: Chemists and Druggist
https://linctas.ent.sirsidynix.net.au/client/en_AU/names/search/results?qu=Eglinton#

1844: Nov 15 – Benjamin Eglinton arrived at Van Diemen’s Land – nothing is known of his life as a convict until the end of his sentence in 1851. From all accounts he had formed a relationship with a Matilda Martha Brooker – it is not clear if this relationship was formed in Tasmania or if it was on the ship to Melbourne. However it seems a little strange that Benjamin was granted a Ticket-of-Leave in the August of 1848 and Matilda had left here husband earlier in the same year. You have to ask the question who fathered Matilda's last two children she had registered under the name Brooker in 1848 and 1850. Officially there were two children by this relationship born in 1852 and 1856, both born in Victoria both with the surname Eglinton although it was changed to Morgan.

1848: August 7 - CONVICT DEPARTMENT - Comptroller-General's Office, August 7, 1848.
His Excellency the Lieutenant-Governor has been pleased to grant Tickets-of-Leave to the under mentioned Convicts:
Benjamin Eglinton who was transported on the 'Lord Auckland'

 

MORE on Matilda Martha Brooker nee Simmons

Matilda Martha Simmons was a Silk-Winder and Dressmaker. She was born in 1817 at Brighton Sussex England. She was the daughter of John Simmons a Book Keeper and Charlotte Peake.

1836: Aug 2 - Matlida arrived in Hobart, Van Diemen’s Land, Australia on the ship ‘Amelia Thompson’.

Norwich Mercury - February 13th 1836.
EMIGRATION TO VAN DIEMAN'S LAND The splendid first class Ship AMELIA THOMPSON of 477 tons, fitted up under the direction of the EMIGRATION COMMITTEE will sail from the Thames for Van Dieman's Land on the 25th April –

The 'Amelia Thompson' was one of some 12 ships whose voyages arranged by the London Emigration Committee to ship out many single woman of marriage age in the 1830's , to help balance out the population of the then Colony of NSW.
http://www.rushen.com.au/
http://www.rushen.com.au/women.html

1836: Nov 26 – Matlida Martha Simmons permission to marry given to a Mark Brooker convict

1837: Jul 13 - Matilda Martha Simmons age 20 married Mark Brooker at Launceston, Tasmania, Australia
Mark and Matilda had children

1837: Aug 29 – Birth of Martha Matilda Nichols
1839: - Birth of James George Brooker
1841: - Birth of James George Brooker at Evandale Tasmania
1842: - Birth of Lavinis Curran Brooker at Campbell Town Tasmania
1844: - Birth of Amilia Brooker at Hobart Tasmania
1846: - Birth of William Mark Brooker
1848: - Birth of David Morgan Brooker at Hobart Tasmania
1850: - Birth of Charlotte Brooker at Evandale Tasmania
https://www.geni.com/people/Matilda-Brooker/6000000010649699747#/tab/timeline

From the newspaper advert placed by her husband it appears Matlida walked out on him which brings the question, was the child born in 1850 actually his?

1848: - Advert placed in the local paper:-
CAUTION - The Undersigned hereby cautions the public against harbouring his wife, Matilda Brooker, arranging any credit on his account, she the said Matilda Brooker, having left her home and any protection without any just cause or provocation, as that he will not be responsible for any dept's she may after this date. Mark Brooker, Brunswick Wine Vaults, Liverpool Street, March 31st 1848.

1851: Matilda departed on the ship ‘William’ from Launceston, Van Diemen’s Land to Melbourne, Victoria with 3 of her children.

1852: No record has been found that Benjamin Eglinton ever married Matilda Brooker nee Simmons – however in 1852 a Louisa Eglinton was born in Melbourne and in 1856 a Morton Eglinton was born in Ballarat. (Morton was listed as James Benjamin in the Birth Index and Morton on the actual certificate). Parents were listed as James Benjamin and Matilda for both children. It can only be assumed that Matilda had changed her name to Eglinton as we assume Benjamin was not prepared to commit bigamy which if caught would have led to further incarceration. The question has to be asked why Benjamin abandoned Matilda and his two children.

1852: Louisa Eglinton born at Collwood, Victoria, Australia
1856: James Benjamin Eglinton also known as Morton Eglinton born at Ballarat, Victoria, Australia

1856: For whatever reason Benjamin abandoned Matilda and her children and returned to England

After her relationship with Benjamin Matilda married
1857: A marriage record Matilda Eglinton age 40 married Christopher Edward Morgan at Ballarat, Victoria Australia
Christopher was born in 1821, in Leeds, Yorkshire, England. His occupation was Compositor 'Ballarat Star' newspaper.
Matilda and Christopher had children: taken from the internet but needs checking!!!

1858: Edward born Ball – Parents Edward and Matilda Eglinton
1859: Caroline born Skipton – Parents Christopher Edward and Matilda Simmons
1861: Emma born Ball – Parents Christopher Edward and Matilda Eglinton
1863: Frederick born Ball – Parents Edward and Matilda Brooker
http://www.rootschat.com/forum/index.php?topic=176216.27

1881: Jun 1 - Matilda died at Ballarat, Victoria, Australia age 64.

 

1851: Dec 12 - Benjamin Eglinton sailed from Launceston, Tasmania to Melbourne on the ship William, accompanied by Matilda Brooker nee Simmons (wife of Mark Brooker Ex Convict) and 3 of her children (Spelt Broker on the shipping record). Benjamin was listed as Free by Servitude.

In the Tasmanian convict records it states Benjamin Eglinton (Free by Servitude) a passenger departed Launceston on June 22nd 1851 on the ship 'William' to Sydney

Mean while back in England
1851: Census – 47 Spicer Street Saint Dunstans Stepney London
Sophia Eglington – Head – Condition? -age 46 1805 – Governess - Shepton Mallet, Somerset
Sophia Eglington – Dau – age 14 1837 - Hat Trimmer - Spitalfields, Middlesex

1852: No record has been found that Benjamin Eglinton ever married Matilda Brooker nee Simmons – however in 1852 a Louisa Eglinton was born in Melbourne and in 1856 a Morton Eglinton was born in Ballarat. (Morton was listed as James Benjamin in the Birth Index and Morton on the actual certificate). Parents were listed as James Benjamin and Matilda for both children. It can only be assumed that Matilda had changed her name to Eglinton as we assume Benjamin was not prepared to commit bigamy, which if caught would have led to further incarceration. The question has to be asked why Benjamin abandoned Matilda and his two children.
Benjamin and Matilda had children:

1852: Louisa Eglinton born at Collwood, Victoria, Australia
Louisa died in 1878 in very sad circumstances she had taken her step-father's surname (Morgan) - see just below James

1856: James Benjamin Eglinton also known as Morton Eglinton born at Ballarat, Victoria, Australia - To-date we have no record of what happend to James/Morton

We have the following article with courtesy of Ross Price of Australia

WARNING: this makes grim reading - The Ballarat Courier Victoria - Monday 25 March 1872 p 2 Article

SINGULAR CASE OF SUICIDE.
A young woman named Louisa Morgan, aged about nineteen years, and a servant in the family of Mr Robert Jones, of Sturt street, committed suicide on Saturday last, by cutting her throat, under somewhat painful and melancholy circumstances. The deceased was a robust, vigorous, and rather good-looking girl. Though peculiar in her manner at times, she was treated with more than ordinary consideration by Mrs Jones and her family, to whom she had been known for over eight years. She had been a domestic in the employment of Mrs Bradshaw, Mrs Jones' mother, previously, but had been with Mrs Jones for about eighteen months. She was the daughter of a Mrs Morgan, who resides on Soldiers' Hill.

She took her stepfather's patronymic, but her real name was Brooker. Until within the last few months she was a remarkably steady sensible girl, attentive to her work, quiet and respectful in her manner, and was so great a favourite with Mr Jones' family, that she was regarded almost in the light of a companion.
During the Christmas holidays it appears she went down to Melbourne on a visit to some relatives, and remained there a week. Since her return she was completely altered in her manner.

Instead of being tidy, diligent, and attentive to her business, she became reserved, absent-minded, and careless about her attire and appearance. She maintained a sort of clandestine correspondence with some person in Melbourne sending her letters, which she got addressed by one of Mr Jones' daughters, under cover to her sister-in-law, and receiving letters evidently in a man's handwriting. Those communications appeared to increase the reserve and peculiarity of her demeanour, and it seems very probable that they had some connection with the unfortunate girl's unhappy fate. On Wednesday last she received one of those letters, and Mrs Jones, who delivered it to her, could see that the superscription was in the handwriting of a man. She questioned her about the matter, but the deceased told her that the letters were from her little nephew. The receipt of the letter appeared to intensify her gloominess and despondency and in the afternoon, having obtained some money, she purchased as was afterwards ascertained, a shilling's worth of laudanum from Mr Griffiths, a chemist in the neighbourhood.

There is some reason to believe that she took a portion of the laudanum, and that it failed in its effect. She went to bed early on Thursday night, and in the morning complained of being ill and unable to leave her bed. She could give no satisfactory explanation of her illness, but complained of her head; and though she rose in the afternoon, she could do little, a she seemed in a sort of stupor.

On Thursday night she disappeared, but was not missed till morning, when all the enquiries made failed to discover her whereabouts. On Friday night she presented herself at the house of Mrs Jones' father, and informed them that she had wandered away, not knowing where she was going, in the direction of Creswick, and had been picked up by a gentleman who was returning to Ballarat in a buggy, and brought into town. There is no reason whatever for sup-
posing that the deceased was subject to somnambulistic peregrinations, as stated in an evening contemporary. She did frequently walk about the garden attached to Mr Jones' house at night; but it arose from the fact that she was troubled in her mind, and could not sleep. She was kept by Mrs Jones' mother on Friday night, and brought back to her mistress on Saturday morning, about nine o'clock. The poor girl appeared deeply affected, as she cried bitterly,
and explained her conduct by stating that she did not know what she was doing. Mrs Jones treated her with every kindness, and she then proceeded
with her work. About twelve o'clock she was missed, and after a search it was found that she had gone into a small bedroom detached from the house, and locked herself in. Mrs Jones called her repeatedly, but received no answer.

It was noticed also that, hearing someone outside the door, the deceased turned the key in the lock in such a manner as to prevent anyone seeing into the interior of the apartment. Thinking she was only indulging in a little temper, Mrs Jones did not disturb her, but allowed her to remain in the room. About one o'clock, however, she became uneasy, and sent one of her little boys to call her. The boy, finding no notice was taken of his message, endeavoured to raise the window, and then discovered that the wretched girl had cut her throat, and was lying on her face bleeding profusely. Mr Robert Jones arrived home just as the discovery was made. He at once rushed to the room, but finding the door too strong to be broken open, he gained admission through the window. He found the deceased lying on her face, her chin supported by a bundle of linen, with a deep gash in her throat, from which the blood was flowing copiously. She was alive, but when questioned gave no sign of consciousness beyond opening her eyes and apparently recognising those about her. On the floor were two carving knives; one of them. that with which she had inflicted the wound, being quite new, and the other an old one, which she probably thought was not sharp enough for her purpose. That the act was the result of premeditation, was evident from the fact that she abstracted the new carving knife from Mrs Jones' bedroom, where it hid been placed along with other cutlery that had never been used. The quantity of blood on the floor was quite enormous. The walls, furniture, and bedding were smeared with the ghastly tokens of her struggles, the marks of her outstretched, bloodstained hands being perceptible on the floor in several places. She would seem to have almost severed the windpipe, and was thus probably prevented from calling for assistance; either that, or with astonishing resolution and nerve she inflicted the wound, and then while bleeding took a sheet form the bed, rolled it up, placed it pillow wise on the floor, lay down with her face upon it, and in that position bled almost to death. Mr Jones had her immediately conveyed to the Hospital, where Dr Owen at tended her. The wound having been stitched, it is stated- though we doubt the fact- that she asked for a drink of water. She was placed in bed, made a sign for water, and gradually fell into a state of unconsciousness until she expired, in about an hour after her admission. An Inquest will be held today upon the body. The affair excited a good deal of interest and sympathy for the unfortunate girl when It became known in Ballarat on Saturday. It was stated that she had been fretting owing to Mr Jones and his family being about to return to England; but, from various circumstances, which will no doubt be revealed at the inquest, her state of mind was superinduced from some more serious source of disappointment or trouble.

1856: It is thought Benjamin Eglinton returned to England about this time, he then turns up in the 1861 census with his wife Sophia.
However back in Australia Matilda married a Christopher Edward Morgan in Ballarat Victoria Australia

Benjamin is now back with Sophia
1861: Census - 47 Spicer Street Stepney – appears to be a shared building with other families
Benjamin Eglinton – Head – age 63 1798 – Chemist – Blackfriars Middlesex??
Sophia Raymond Eglinton – Wife – age 63 - Chemist Wife – Shepton Mallet
Sophia Eglinton – Dau – single – age 23 - age Hat Trimmer - Spitalfields, Middlesex,
* James Eglinton – Gson – age 6 1855 – Scholar - London, Middlesex - Child of Benjamin's first son James 1819
* Mary Eglinton – Gdau – single – age 5 1856 – Scholar - London, Middlesex - Child of Benjamin;s first son James 1819

* 1854: Birth record – James William Eglington at London – Jun quarter (1c 74)
1854: Dec 24 - Baptism at London - Find my Past
James William Eglington son of James Eglington anf his wife Mary Ann

* 1855: Birth record – Mary Ann Ellen Elington at London – Dec quarter (1c 70)
1855: Dec 9 - Baptism at London - Find my Past
Mary Ann Eglington daughter of James Eglington anf his wife Mary Ann
They are not found in the 1871 census

1871: Census – no record of Benjamin Eglinton found
However there is a Benjamin Eglinton who turns up in 1871 age 49 and living at Whitmore Road St Leonards Shoreditch, occupation, 'Man's Agent' born at Belgium - Is this Benjamin, connected as it seems odd Belgium is mentioned as his birth place, or is his age wrong! - There is no further mention of this Benjamin!.

Meanwhile Sophia was staying here with her daughter who had married John Scarlett in the Sep quarter of 1863
1871: Census – 187 Whitechapel Road
John Scarlett – Head – age 30 – Staple House Keeper – Surrey
Sophia Scarlett – Wife – age 32 – Spitlefields
Sarah J Scarlet – Mother – Widow – age 67 – Middlesex
Sophia Elington – MaLaw – Married – age 75 – Somerset
James Ireland – Servant – age 14 - ? – Middlesex
Mariah Wilkinson – Servant – single – age 28 – Cook – Ireland
Jesse Farrell – Servant – age 17 - Dom Servant - Middlesex
John R Muirhead – Lodger – single – age 24 - Salesman – Middlesex
Thomas Evans – Lodger – single – age 29 – Butter Dealer – Berkshire
James Payne – Lodger – single – age 27 – Cellerman – Suffolk
James Southwell – Lodger – Married – age 26 – Warehouseman – Cambridgeshire
John Hitching – Lodger – single – age 27 – Carpenter - Essex

Sophia died
1874: Death record - Sophia Eglington at Bethnal Green – Dec quarter (1c 204) age 76

1881: Census - Shoreditch Workhouse 213 Kingsland Road Shoreditch London, Middlesex
Benjamin Eglington – Inmate of Workhouse – Widower – age 85 1796 - Chemist & Druggist - BRUGES BELGIUM

People ended up in the workhouse for a variety of reasons, usually it was because they were too poor, old or ill to support themselves. This may have resulted from such things like lack of work during periods of high unemployment, or someone having no family willing or able to provide care for them when they became elderly or sick.
A point of interest - The First World War Heroine Edith Cavill was later in 1903 assistant Matron at the Shorditch Workhouse infirmary where she pioneers follow-up home visits for discharged patients.

1881: Census – Death record – Benjamin Eglington at Shoreditch – Dec quarter (1C 114) age 85 – 1796
This was about the same time Benjamin's son William Eglinton (1826) died in France

MORE on Mark Brooker

Mark Brooker was born on Apr 19 1808 at Worth, sussex, England. On Mar 21 1826 he was living at Hampshire England. He arrive on Apr 26 1826 in Hobart, Van Diemen’s Land Australia on the ship Earl St Vincent

The Trial

https://www.oldbaileyonline.org/browse.jsp?id=t18251208-40-defend283&div=t18251208-40#highlight

FOURTH DAY. MONDAY, DECEMBER 12.
Middlesex Cases, Second Jury,
Before Mr. Serjeant Arabin.
40. MARK BROOKER was indicted for stealing, on the 6th of December, at St. Andrew, Holborn, 1 piece of silk, containing, in length, 35 yards, value 5l, the goods of William Britten and John Jackson, his masters, in their dwelling-house.
JAMES HULME. I am a pawnbroker, and live in Museum-street, Bloomsbury. On the 6th of December, in the evening, the prisoner brought some silk to pawn, in the name of George Burling , No. 16, Hart-street, Bloomsbury; I asked how much there was of it; he said about six or seven yards - I asked how much he gave for it - he said 2s. 6d. a yard - that it was his own, and he had bought it at East Grinstead, about a month ago - that he had been there three months. He said, "Why don't you think it is mine?" - I said, "No; I will send my boy to Hart-street;" he said he would go with him: I told him to wait there; he went to the door - I followed, and brought him back - he then said he lived at No. 16, Holborn, which I found was true. The silk measures thirty-five yards.
WILLIAM BRITTEN. I am in partnership with Mr. John Jackson - we are linen-drapers and silk-mercers, and live in the parish of St. Andrew's, Holborn; we both rent the house, and live there. The prisoner has been nearly six months in our service, as porter, and had access to the property. Hulme sent to me on the 6th of December - I saw this silk, and know it to be ours - it measures about thirty-five yards, and is worth between 5l and 6l.
Prisoner. Q. Did you see me take it? A. No; it was in the warehouse, on a pile of brown paper.
Prisoner's Defence. I found it down in the dirt, among the rubbish.
One witness gave the prisoner an excellent character.
GUILTY - DEATH. Aged 18.
Recommended to Mercy by the Prosecutor and Jury, on account of his character .

 

1826: Feb 17 – Evening Mail
Mark Brooker age 18 was among several prisoners in Newgate Prison to have their death sentence reprieved –
“His Majesty was graciously please to respite, during his royal pleasure, all the above-named convicts, excepting John Jones and Edward Cockerell, upon whom the law is left to take its course, they are ordered for execution on Tuesday next

1826: - Arrives in the Colonies set to work for a Mrs Cox as coachman
1836: - Received permission to marry: 26 November 1836. Married Matilda Martha Simmons on 18 January 1837
1837: - Jan 18 – Mark Brooker married Matilda Martha Simmons a free person
1838: - Mar 10 - Received a conditional pardon
1837: - Launceston area Gentlemen’s Servant
1840: - The Hobart Town Courier and Van Diemen’s Land Gazette Conditional remissions of their sentences
Mark Brooker of The Earl St….
1847: Mark Brooker, Pardoned as long as he never set foot in UK (This would olso included India) again! Again The Earl St v…... mentioned
1848: - Colonial Times (Hobart) Purchase of Wine cellars and dwellings, also horse and coach to run himself!
1848: - Advert placed in the local paper:-
CAUTION - The Undersigned hereby caution s the public against harboring his wife, Matilda Brooker, arranging any credit on his account, she the said Matilda Brooker, having left her home and any protection without any just cause or provocation, as that he will not be responsible for any dept's she may after this date. Mark Brooker, Brunswick Wine Vaults, Liverpool Street, March 31st 1848.
1849: - Insolvent court March 31 1848
1849: Aug 18, Friday - Mark Brooker put an advert in Colonial Times Hobart:
"All demands against the Estate must be sent in to the undersigned for examination on or before Tuesday, 14th instant, for the purpose of winding up its affairs." Henry Tonkin, Assignee. Old Wharf, August 7 1848.
1850: - Departure- Departed Launceston Ship Peri for Adelaide. Passenger in Steerage.
1850: - Arrival Launceston Returned from Adelaide on the Ship Peri.
1851: - Departure Launceston to Calcutta via Swan River (Swan River Colony i.e. Western Australia) It is unclear if this is Mark Brooker senior or his son, William Mark Brooker also known as Mark!
Left as a Seaman named Mark Broker on the Brig “Lawsons”. Arrived Bunbury 19 Feb 1851, unloaded cargo and the Ship proceeded direct to Calcutta.
1851: - Census Residence Weillington St, Launceston
With 12 others who seem to be his whole Family and another Adult married couple and children. Mark Brooker was head of the house.
Mark Brooker
1866: The dwelling of Mark Brooker is broken into (The Mercury Hobart,... Monday 9 July 1866). http://www.convictrecords.com.au/convicts/brooker/mark/79539

1866: Wednesday June 13 - The Conwall Chronical - POLICE COURT. Saturday, 9th June, 1866. (Before Wm. Gunn, Esq., P. M)
HOUSEBREAKING - Thomas Grant was charged by Con stable Daniel O'Donnell witb having, on the 10th instant, feloniously broken into and entered the dwelling house of Mr Mark Brooker, at Franklin Village, and stolen therefrom an opposum-skin rug, a double pair of blankets, a cotton rug, and other articles.
Mark Brooker sworn, deposed — I reside at Franklin Village, near Kerry Lodge, and have a small farm and dwelling-bouse there; no one resides with me; yesterday I left my house about half -past 11 o'clock in the forenoon, and secured my door by a padlock ; I returned at about quarter-past 4 in the afternoon and found that the house had been entered during my absence by drawing the staple in the door to which the hasp was fastened; the padlock was in the staple in the jamb to which the hasp had been sawed: I examined the place inside and missed my opossum-skin rug, a cotton rug, and a pair of blankets, which had been taken off the bed; some articles of food were also carried away; I searched about and found the track of footsteps leading towards the road; I went to a neighbour and told him what had occurred, and was then going towards the Police Station to make a report; owing to something Mr Fisher said to me I remained with him for a little time, and saw two men coming down the road from the direction of Kerry Lodge towards the Village. The prisoner Thomas Grant was one of them. He was carrying a bundle, which I saw consisted of an opossum skin rug. I asked him to let me look at it. He said, 'Look at it, look at it' and continued to walk on and carry it with him. Mr Fisher and I followed after him and still asked to see the rug. The prisoner's companion then asked the prisoner to put it down, he did so and I opened it and found inside it all the things I had missed from my house I said these were the things stolen from my house.
Mr Fisher said — '' Give him in charge' The prisoner, after he laid his bundle down walked away before I examined it, and the other man with him. We called them back and they came back ; I charged them with stealing the things. The prisoner said he did it and the other man had nothing to do with it. The prisoner then went on towards the Village. Mr Fisher told me to follow him and give him in charge, and he would look after the other man, When he said that, the other man bolted down the road which leads towards the White Hills. I followed tbe prisoner and met Constable O'Donuell coming towards me ; I gave him the prisoner in my charge. I returned with the constable and prisoner, with whom the bundle was left, and the constable took possession of it. I identify the rugs and blankets produced. They are my property, and of the value of £l. 4s. 6d. Constable O'Donuell was examined and the prisoner, who had nothing to say in his defence, was then fully committed for trial.

WILLIAM EGLINTON born 1826
Son of Benjamin Eglinton a Chemist and Elizabeth Jones
1826: William Eglington - no baptism record.
We see in 1825 when William's sister (Elizabeth) was buried she had a note to say the family were Dissenters. Maybe William was baptised in another church - the search goes on

William’s mother died
1830: Dec 19 - Burial at St Giles Without Cripplegate Church London
Elizabeth Eglington of Paul's Alley London age 37 (1793)

William’s father remarried
1831: Sep 11 - Marriage record at London
Benjamin Eglington married Sophia Wilkinson
Benjamin and Sophia had a daughter Sophia born about 1836 at Spitalfields, Middlesex- no baptism record found

1850: Marriage record – William Eglinton married Mary Cope at London – Dec quarter (2 162)
1850: Oct 27 - Marriage at Christ Church Greyfriars Newgate,London – Entry 139
William Eglinton Bachelor and Licence Victualler of King William Street married Mary Cope Spinster
Fathers: Benjamin Eglinton Chemist and William Cope labourer
Witness: James Eglinton (brother) and Sophia Eglinton (possibly his step-mother)

Mary Cope was one of 13 children, she was the daughter of Thomas Cope a Farm Labour of Winslade Bassingstoke and his wife Sarah
William and Mary had children:

[1] 1851: Birth record – William James Eglinton at City of London – Sep quarter (2 201) – ANCESTRAL LINE see below

[2] 1852: Birth record - Herbert Eglinton born Dec 19th at London - Dec quarter (1c 81) - Twin
Herbert was baptised on Dec 29th at St Mary's Church London - son of William Eglington a Tobacconist and his wife Mary
We find in later records Herbert was handicapped mentally form birth.

[3] 1852: Birth record - Walter Eglinton born Dec 19th at London - Dec quarter (1c 81) - Twin
For some reason Walter was baptised on Feb 27th 1853 at St Mary's Church son of William Eglington a Tobacconist and his wife Mary
Walter died as an infant in 1854 Jun quarter

[4] 1855: Birth record - Louisa Eglinton at St George Hanover Square - Sep quarter (1a 187)

[5] 1857: Birth record - Charles Eglinton at St George Hanover Square - Jun quarter (1a 219)
Charles Eglinton married Harriett Keene on 25/11/1877. They had two children inc William Charles born 20/12/1881.
William Charles Eglinton married Anne Rebecca Feakes Brown on 19/04/1908 and they had three children inc. my grandfather Percy William James.
Percy William James Eglinton then married my grandmother Phyllis Sutherland in 1939 and they had one son, my Dad, David William Eglinton - Dawn Tiernan.

[6] 1859: Birth record - Ernest Eglinton at St George Hanover Square - Sep quarter (1a 221)

[7] 1864: Birth record - Arthur Eglinton at St George Hanover Square - Jun quarter (1a 280)
Arthur age 26 appears to have married Mary Anne Emily Priscilla Czzard on Dec 28th 1889 at Folkstone Kent

[8] 1867: Birth record - Florence Eglinton at St George Hanover Square - Jun quarter (1a 330)
Florence never married - in 1911 she was living with her brother's (William James Eglinton 1851) son William David Eglington 1877 at 66 Ross Road Wallington Beddington Surrey - She died on April 14th 1956 age 88 at The Stores Wisborough Green Sussex leaving £3083. 0s 3d to Herbert Kenyon Padwick a surveyor.

[9] 1870: Birth record - Percy Eglinton at St George Hanover Square - Sep quarter (1a 304)
Percy married Harriet Matilda Fullard in the June quarter of 1894 at Fulham

1851: Census – 66 Cannon Street St Mary Abchurch
William Eglinton – Head – age 25 1826 - Tobacconist – Finsbury Middlesex
Mary Eglinton – Wife – age 20 1831 – Tobacconist’s Wife – Basingstoke Hampshire

1861: Census – No record found – but the family were in London as children were born there - where were they?
Where they in France on April 7th, at the time of the census?

1871: Census – 133 Cambridge Street St George Hanover Square
William Eglinton – Head – age 45 1826 – Clerk – St Johns London
Mary Eglinton – Wife – age 34 1837 – Hampshire
Herbert Eglinton – Son – age 17 – St Mary Abchurch - there is a entry of a disability!
Louisa Eglinton – Dau – age 14 - St George Hanover Square London
Charles Eglinton – Son – age 12 - St George Hanover Square London
Ernest Eglinton – Son – age 10 - St George Hanover Square London
Arthur Eglinton – Son – age 6 - St George Hanover Square London
Florence Eglinton – Dau – age 3 - St George Hanover Square London
Percy Eglinton – Son – age 0 - St George Hanover Square London
Matilda Tribe – Servant – age 19 – Brighton Sussex
William John Landis – Lodger – single - age 37 – Clerk at War Office – Maidstone Kent

In 1875 the first newspaper announcement appeared in the Sporting Life showing William 1826 had taken work in France. It also appears his son William James Eglinton 1851 and his 2nd wife Lizzie joined them sometime after their wedding on Septmeber 6th 1875. William James and Lizzie's first son William David Eglinton was born there followed by Estelle Lizzie and Lawrence Edward. We do know William James 1851 and his family were back in England by the 1881 census. Although we find William 1826 died at his French home on Qctober 26th 1881.

1875: May 15 - Sporting Life
MR WILLIAM EGLINTON
Successor to the late Manager for Mr J Smith, of Glasgow
RUE CLERY - BOULOGNE-SUR-MER, FRANCE
Begs to CAUTION the PUBLIC against persons using his name at any of the Race Meetings, no one being authorised to do so.

It also appears the family diversified as this advert was also July 17th 1875 in the Sporting Life

MR WILLIAM EGLINTON
Rue-Clery, Boulogne-Sur-Mer, France
DEALER IN SECOND-HAND GOODS
BEST PRICES GIVEN FOR BONES, RAGS, WASTE PAPER AND DRIPPING

1881: Oct 26 - William Eglinton died whilst in France
William Eglinton, age 57, a person of independent means, died on October 26th, 1881 at 2 in the afternoon at his home at 2 rue de Cléry. He was born in London and was the husband of Mary Cope, age 46. He was the son of the deceased Benjamin Eglinton. There is a note "Other information has not been sent to us". The witnesses were Henry Killington Jarrett, age 33, a businessman and Casmir Prevost, age 58, a messenger - thanks to Soosi Monahan & Kirsty Price.

1881: Nov 10 - Administration of the Person Estate of William Eglinton late of 158 Cambridge-Street, Pimilco in the County of Middlesex, a Commision Agent who died October 26th 1881 at 2 Rue Clery Boulogne-Sur-Mer in France was granted at the Principal Registry to Mary Eglinton of 158 Cambridge-Street and 2 Rue-Clery Widow of the Relict. Personal Estate £2,550, 2s, 5d.

1881: Census Mary Cope Eglinton and her children were still in Boulogne. The Boulogne census was completed in December 1881 so her husband, William Eglinton had only died about a month before. They were still at 2 rue de Cléry. Mary is listed as age 47 and of independent means. The children were: Louisa 27, Ernest 21, Herbert 26, Arthur 17, Florence 14 and Percy 11. Her niece (should be grand-daughter), Violetta, age 11 was also living with them. All were born in England - thanks to Soosi Monahan & Kirsty Price.

1891: Census - no record found of family - where were they?
Again where they in France?

1911: Census - 13 Beddington Grove Bandon Hill Croydon, Beddington, Surrey,
Mary Eglinton - Head - Widow - age 75 - Independent Means - Hampshire Winslade
Herbert Eglinton - Son - Single - age 58 - London - Feebleminded from birth
Mary states she has had 8 children, 1 has died.
Property of 5 rooms

Herbert died in 1931 at Croydon Surrey age 78

WILLIAM JAMES EGLINTON born 1851
Son of William Eglinton and Mary Cope

1851: Birth record – William James Eglinton at City of London – Sep quarter (2 201)
1851: Aug 16 – Birth of William James Eglinton at 66 Cannon Street London – property now home of Alpha Bank London
Father: William Eglinton a Tobacconist and Mary Eglinton formerly Cope
Entry: 270

1851: Nov 30 - Baptism at St Marys Church London - Entry 374
William James Eglinton born Aug 15 1851 son of William Eglinton a Tobacconist of Cannon Street and his wife Mary

1870: Marriage record – William James Eglinton married Sarah Elizabeth Whiting at Chelsea – Mar quarter (1a 311)
1870: Feb 31 – Marriage at St Luke Church London – Entry 337
William James Eglinton age 21 Bachelor, Clerk married Sarah Elizabeth Whiting a Spinster – both of 5 Stanley Street
Fathers: William Eglinton a Clerk and John Whiting deceased Farmer
Witness: John Drake and Christina Drake
William and Sarah had a daughter:  

1870: Birth record – Violetta Eglinton at St George Hanover Square – Dec quarter (1a 331)

1871: St George Hanover Square Westminster
William Eglington – Head – age 20 1851 – Clerk at a Map sellers – St Mary’s Abchurch (Cannon Street) London
Sarah E Eglington – Wife – age 24 – Shoreditch Middlesex
Violetta Eglington – Dau – age 0 - Middlesex,

1871: Death record – Sarah Elizabeth Eglinton at St George Hanover Square – Dec quarter (1a 232) age 24

It appears Violetta was not taken into William’s next marriage. There could be several reason but what we do know is sometime about 1875 after William married Lizzie they moved to Boulogne-Sur-Mere France where William was employed as manager to Mr J Smith of Glasgow on the local racing track. William and Lizzie lived in France until about 1881 and there they had three children. From this it is fairly certain William could speak French and also shows he must have had some good schooling.
So what happed to Violetta

VIOLETTA EGLINTON born 1870
Daughter of William James Eglinton 1851and his first wife Sarah Elizabeth Whiting

1870: Birth record – Violetta Eglinton at St George Hanover Square – Dec quarter (1a 331)

1871: St George Hanover Square Westminster
William Eglington – Head – age 20 1851 – Clerk at a Map sellers – St Mary’s Abchurch (Cannon Street) London
Sarah E Eglington – Wife – age 24 – Shoreditch Middlesex
Violetta Eglington – Dau – age 4 months - Middlesex,

Violetta's mother died
1871:
Death record – Sarah Elizabeth Eglinton at St George Hanover Square – Dec quarter (1a 232) age 24
It is not clear what happened to Violetta after her mother's death but the next we find is...........

Violetta Eglinton/Ellington turns up here
1881: Census - 1 Wentworth Street Brighton
*Mabel L G Parker – Head – Widow – age 28 1853 - Income From Int Of Money – Greece
Violet Ellington – Boarder – age 10 Scholar – Middlesex
Caroline Welfare – Servant – single – age 23 - Dom Servt - Haywards Heath, Sussex

The 1881 English census was taken on April 3rd where Violetta was staying with Mabel above. Violetta managed to also turn up on the 1881 French census which was taken in the December she was staying with her now widowed grandmother Lizzie at 2 rue de Cléry together with her Aunts and Uncles. Her Grandfather had just died the month earlier, so maybe she was there for his funeral.

MORE on Mabel Leonora G Eglington
In 1861 Mabel Eglington age 9 appears to be a pupil at Quinley House School a Roman Catholic Establishment for Young Ladies
in All Saints Brentford where she gave her birth place as Spain,

*1869: Marriage record – Mabel Leonora G Ellington married George Hardgrave William Broughton Parker at Pancras – Sep quarter (1b
61).
1869: July 29 - Marriage at the Parish Church of ? - Entry 427
George Hardgrave William Houghton Parker of Full age, Bachelor, Journalist
Mabel Leonora Grace Ellington of Full age, Sprinster
Fathers: George Hardgrave William Houghton Parker - Clergyman and Francis William Ellington a Gentleman
Witness: Richard Robert Maitland and Violetta Elington

1867: - George had passed his exam at the Royal College of Physicians, Kings College.

George was the son of the Rev George H Parker of St Andrews Church Bethnal Green, London.
George Hargreave William Broughton was born in the Dec quarter of 1846 at Bethnal Green
George died in the June quarter of 1870 at the age of 23 (1847) at Islington.
1870: July 2 - Morning Post – On the 28th ult, at 9 Hargrave-Park-Road, Holloway, the death of George Hargrave Parker Esq, age 23.

1871: Mabel now a widow at the early age on 19 was living at Hargrave Park Road, Islington although she now claims London is her birth town. Sadly Mabel herself died in 1885 (Jun quarter) aged only 30 at West Ham.

1891: Census – Violetta Eglinton recorded as a Boarder with Ralph Skinner a 55 year old Farmer and his wife Ellen at Up Waltham Farm, Pilley Green, Up Waltham, Westhampnett, Sussex

1901: Census - At Shackleford, woking Guildford Surrey Violetta Eglington age 30 a House Keeper (not domestic) - Bording with her were five children by the name of Tice and a domestic servant.

1911: Violetta Eglington was now at 34 Dean Park Road Bournemouth where she was a 40 year old Housekeeper for J H Bishops a Stationer and his family

1938: Nov 4 - Death record – Violetta Eglinton at Barnstaple – Dec (5b 491) age 67 – 1871
Violetta was Hon secretary to the Newport Branch of the Conservative Association. She was house keeper to the late Mr J Hawkins Bishop of Victoria Road Barnstable, who in his Will left Violetta £100.
The principle mourners at her funeral were half sister Bertha Eglinton to whom she left the effects of her estate, and her half brothers Frederick and Sydney. Flowers were received from her father William James Eglinton and her step-mother Lizzie, they did not attend.

1939: Jan – Violetta Eglinton of 1 Fortescue-road, Barnstable Devonshire spinster, died on November 4th 1938. Probate London January 4th to Bertha Agnes Eglinton (sister) spinster. Effects £229. 18s (equivalent in todays money 2016 £14,117.84.

William remarried
1875: Marriage record – William James Eglinton married Lizzy Ann Spender at St George Hanover Square – Sep quarter (1a 651)
1875: Sep 6 - Marriage at St Gabriels Church Pimlico Middlesex - Entry 185
William James Eglinton age 26 Widower married Lizzey Anne Spender age 21 Spinster - both of 133 Cambridge Street
Father's William Eglinton a Clerk and John Spender a Carpenter
Lizzie Ann Spender was the daughter of Thomas Spender a Carpenter and his wife Maria a Dressmaker of 18 Molyneux Street Marylebone London in 1861.
William and Lizzy had children:

[1] William David Eglinton born about 1877 at France
William David Eglinton was born on June 26th, 1876 at 2 in the morning to William James Eglinton, age 26, a clerk and his wife, Liz Ann Spender, age 20, living at 12 rue de l'amiral Bruix. The witnesses were William Eglinton, age 54, a trader/broker and Louis Chiebaut, age 57, a clerk - thanks to Soosi Monahan & Kirsty Price.
William David Eglinton never married – in 1911 he was living at 66 Ross Road Wallington Beddington Surrey, by trade he was a 34 year old Wholesale Optician (Manager). Living with him was his 43 year old spinster Aunt Florence Eglinton, who was born at St George Hanover Square, the daughter of William Eglinton 1826 and his wife Mary Cope.
On June 30th 1900 whilst living at 49 Ladywell Road Lewisham and carrying on the business of Optician, applied to be admitted to the Freedom of the City of London in the Company of Spectacle-maker of London - Kisty Price.
In 1929 onward there are several patents registered of 'improvements to hinges on glasses' 'fitting of rimless glasses' 'collapsible leg or post' 'frame hinge' and 'folding spectacles' both in England and America by William David Eglinton of Croydon. William died on Feb 17th 1956 age 78 in the district of Midhurst at South Lodge Wisborough Green Sussex. He left £27,654 12s 11d to Gertrude Alexandra Nicholls a married women. Wisborough Green is were his spinster Aunt Florence Eglinton also had a property called the 'Stores' which was apparently close by. She died on April 14th the same year.

[2] Estelle Lizzie Eglinton born about 1878 at France
Estelle Lizzie Eglinton was born September 25th, 1877 at 7 in the morning to William James Eglinton, age 28, a clerk and his wife Liz Anna Spender, age 22, living at 136 rue Royale. The witnesses were William Eglinton, age 48 (incorrect), a forwarding agent and Louis Chiebaut, age 29 (either an error or son of the witness for William David), a clerk - thanks to Soosi Monahan & Kirsty Price.
Estelle married John Arthur Beckley in the Dec quarter of 1905 - In 1911 the couple were living at 67 Larkhall Lane Lambeth, John was a Tobacconist.
Estelle died in the Dec quarter of 1938 age 61 at Bromley

[3] Lawrence Edward Eglinton born Jul 17th 1879 at France – ANCESTRAL LINE - See below
Laurence Edward Eglinton was born July 17th 1879 at 10 in the morning to William James Eglinton, age 29, a clerk and his wife, Liz Ann Spender, age 23. The witnesses were William Eglinton, age 57, a trader/broker and Arthur Guillain, age 67, a person of independent means - thanks to Soosi Monahan & Kirsty Price.

[4] Gertrude Florence Eglinton born Sept 8th 1881at Peckham Surrey
Gertrude was born Sep 8th 1881 and baptised Dec 5th 1889 - She married at the age of 31 to Cecil Charles Wilkins a bachelor age 26 on Aug 31st 1913 at Holy Trinty Church Selhurst - her brother Frederick Arthur and he father were witness. Gertrude Died age 90 in the March quater of 1972 at Kingston on Thames, Greater London.

[5] Wallace Edgar Eglinton – born Nov 23rd 1883 at Middlesex
Wallace was born Nov 23rd 1883 and baptised Dec 5th 1889 - He died age 9 in 1893

[6] Frederick Arthur Eglinton born Oct 27th 1885 at London Middlesex
Frederick was born on Oct 27th 1885 and baptised Dec 5th 1889 - He was a 24 year old Store Keeper when he married Alice Mary Mark a spinster age 32 on March 27th 1910 at St George the Martyr, Queen Square - In 1911 the couple were living at 73 Lawson Road Croydon Surrey - He died on Dec 16th 1965 at St James Hospital Devives Wiltshire, address, 30 The Newlands Wallington Surrey, he left £2282 to Ellen Isabel Bundy a married women.

[7] Marguerite Nellie Eglinton born Dec 10th 1887 at Battersea Middlesex
Marguerite was born Dec 10th 1887 and baptised on Dec 5th 1889 - She never married but changed her name to Nellie Marguerite Eglinton, she died on May 31st 1953 at 31 Copse Hill Wimbledon London, her address was 35 Woodside Ave London. She left £232 13s 8d to her brother Frederick Arthur Eglington a retired Shop manager and her brother Lawrence's widow Miriam Rose Eglinton.

[8] Bertha A Eglinton born Jan 31st 1891 at Battersea Middlesex
Bertha was born Jan 31st 1891 and baptised on March 22nd 1891 - She never married and died on June 15th 1977 at 42 Mill Road Worthing West Sussex - she left £3092.

[9] Sidney James Eglinton born Jul 29th 1896 at Earlsfield London
Sidney now an Aircraft Inspector age 31 married Millie Agnes Newell a Spinster age 30 on Sep 30th 1927 - Sidney died age 90 in the Nov of 1986 at Swindon Wiltshire.

William James Eglinton was somehow connected with the Racing community at Boulogne-Sur-Mer in France
There are several newspaper cuttings to this effect.

As mention in his father's profile in 1875 the first newspaper announcement appeared in the Sporting Life showing William 1826 had taken work in France. It also appears his son William James Eglinton 1851 and his 2nd wife Lizzie joined them sometime after their wedding on Septmeber 6th 1875. William James and Lizzie's first son William David Eglinton was born there followed by Estelle Lizzie and Lawrence Edward. We do know both families were back in England by the 1881 census.

1875: May 15 - Sporting Life
MR WILLIAM EGLINTON
Successor to the late Manager for Mr J Smith, of Glasgow
RUE CLERY - BOULOGNE-SUR-MER, FRANCE
Begs to CAUTION the PUBLIC against persons using his name at any of the Race Meetings, no one being authorised to do so.

It also appears the family diversified as this advert was also July 17th 1875 in the Sporting Life

MR WILLIAM EGLINTON
Rue-Clery, Boulogne-Sur-Mer, France
DEALER IN SECOND-HAND GOODS
BEST PRICES GIVEN FOR BONES, RAGS, WASTE PAPER AND DRIPPING

Family had just returned from France
Transcribed as Glinton
1881: Census – 32 Moncrieff Street Camberwell London
William Eglinton – Head – age 29 1852 - Clerk Unemployed – St Mary’s Abchurch London Middlesex
Lizzy Anne Eglinton – age 24 1857 - Marlborough, Wiltshire
William D Eglinton – Son - age 4 – France, British Subject
Estelle L Eglinton – Son – age 3 – France, British Subject
Laurence E Eglinton – Son – age 2 – France, British Subject – ANCESTRAL LINE

1889: - Living at 95 Maysoule Road London

1891: Census – 95 Maysoule Road – Battersea
William J Eglinton – Head – age 38 1853 – Clerk – Middlesex
Lizzie Eglinton – Wife – age 34 - Marlborough, Wiltshire,
William D Eglinton – Son – age 14 – Clerk - France British Subject
Estell L Eglinton – Son – age 13 - France British Subject
Lawrence Eglinton – Son – age 11 - France British Subject – ANCESTRAL LINE
Gertrude Eglinton – Dau – age 9 - Peckham, Surrey
Wallace Eglington – Son – age 6 – Middlesex
Fred A Eglinton – Son – age 5 - London, Middlesex
Marguerite N Eglinton – Dau – age 3 - Battersea, Middlesex
Bertha A Eglinton – Dau – age 0 - Battersea, Middlesex

1901: - Census – 8 Fordyce Road Lewisham
William Eglinton – Head – age 49 1852 - Baker's Clerk - City of London, Middlesex, England
Lizzie Eglinton – Wife – age 44 - Marlborough, Wiltshire
David Eglinton – Son – single - age 24 - Warehouseman & Packer General – France British Subject
Lawrence Eglinton – Son – single - age 21 - Opticians Traveller - France British Subject – ANCESTRAL LINE
Frederick Eglinton – Son – age 15 - Photographic Manufrs Clerk - Battersea, Middlesex
Nellie Eglinton – Dau – age 13 - Battersea, Middlesex
Bertha Eglinton – Dau – age 10 - Earlsfield, London
Sidney Eglinton – Son – age 4 - Earlsfield, London

1911: Census - 8 Harcourt Road Brockley London
William James Eglinton – Head – age 59 1852 - Butcher Clerk - City of London
Lizzy Ann Eglinton – Wife – age 54 - Wiltshire Marlborough
Nellie Eglinton – Dau – single – age 23 - Shop Assitant - London Battersea
Bertha Agnes Eglinton – Dau – single - age 20 – Student - Surrey New Wandsworth
Sidney James Eglinton – Son – age 14 – School - Surrey Lower Tooting

1940: Death record – William J Eglinton at Bromley – Mar quarter (2a 2070) age 88 – 1852
1940: Feb 4 - At County Hospital Farnborough Orpinton - William James Eglinton age 88 of 87 Silver Lane West Wickham Beckenham - formerly a clerk
Cause of Death: La Senility
Informant: S J Eglinton of 59a Rockwood Ave Wallington Surry

1945: Death record – Lizzie A Eglington at Shrewsbury – Sep quarter (6a 694a) age 88 - 1857
1945: Sep 22 - Lizzie Ann Eglinton age 88 at Barringlim Hosiptal of Ellemore House - Widow of William James Eglinton a Commercial Clerk

LAWRENCE EGLINTON born July 17th 1879 at Boulogness France
Son of William James Eglinton and Lizzie Anne Spender

Lawrence Edward Eglinton born Jul 17th 1879 at France – ANCESTRAL LINE - See below
Laurence Edward Eglinton was born July 17th 1879 at 10 in the morning to William James Eglinton, age 29, a clerk and his wife, Liz Ann Spender, age 23. The witnesses were William Eglinton, age 57, a trader/broker and Arthur Guillain, age 67, a person of independent means - thanks to Soosi Monahan & Kirsty Price.

Transcribed as Glinton
1881: Census – 32 Moncrieff Street Camberwell London
William Eglinton – Head – age 29 1852 - Clerk Unemployed – St Mary’s Abchurch London Middlesex
Lizzy Anne Eglinton – age 24 1857 - Marlborough, Wiltshire
William D Eglinton – Son - age 4 – France, British Subject
Estelle L Eglinton – Son – age 3 – France, British Subject
Laurence E Eglinton – Son – age 2 – France, British Subject – ANCESTRAL LINE

Lawrence was baptised at the age of about 10 together with some of his siblings
1889: Dec 5 – Baptism at
Lawrence Edward Eglinton born July 17th 1879 son of William James Eglington a Clerk and his wife Lizzie Anne of 95 Maysoule Road St john’s Battersea Wandsworth

1891: Census – 95 Maysoule Road – Battersea
William J Eglinton – Head – age 38 1853 – Clerk – Middlesex
Lizzie Eglinton – Wife – age 34 - Marlborough, Wiltshire,
William D Eglinton – Son – age 14 – Clerk - France British Subject
Estell L Eglinton – Son – age 13 - France British Subject
Lawrence Eglinton – Son – age 11 - France British Subject – ANCESTRAL LINE
Gertrude Eglinton – Dau – age 9 - Peckham, Surrey
Wallace Eglington – Son – age 6 – Middlesex
Fred A Eglinton – Son – age 5 - London, Middlesex
Marguerite N Eglinton – Dau – age 3 - Battersea, Middlesex
Bertha A Eglinton – Dau – age 0 - Battersea, Middlesex

1901: - Census – 8 Fordyce Road Lewisham
William Eglinton – Head – age 49 - Baker's Clerk - City of London, Middlesex, England
Lizzie Eglinton – Wife – age 44 - Marlborough, Wiltshire
David Eglinton – Son – single - age 24 - Warehouseman & Packer General – France British Subject
Lawrence Eglinton – Son – single - age 21 - Opticians Traveller - France British Subject – ANCESTRAL LINE
Frederick Eglinton – Son – age 15 - Photographic Manufrs Clerk - Battersea, Middlesex
Nellie Eglinton – Dau – age 13 - Battersea, Middlesex
Bertha Eglinton – Dau – age 10 - Earlsfield, London
Sidney Eglinton – Son – age 4 - Earlsfield, London

1911: Census - Tooting Grove Tooting London Sw (maybe The Foundation Hospital
Laurence Eglinton – Servant – age 28 1883 – Porter - France Boulogness Resident – ANCESTRAL LINE

1912: Marriage record – Laurence Edward Eglinton married Miriam Rose Martin at Croydon – Jun quarter (2a 622)
1912: April 27 - Marriage at Christ Church Mitcham - Entry 254
Laurence Edward Eglinton age 32, Bachelor, Hospital Porter to Miriam Rose Martin age 21 Spinster
Laurence of 20 College Road - Miriam of 14 Wilton Road
Fathers: William James Eglington a Clerk and Arthur Martin a Decorator
Witness: Arthur Martin and Mabel Annie Cassie

Miriam Rose Martin was born April 1st 1891 at 92 High Street Battersea - daughter of Arthur Martin a Builder and Hannah Powell
Lawrence and Miriram had children:

[01] 1912: Birth record – William Edward Eglinton at Croydon – Dec quarter (2a 662)
William married Winifred M Hansford in the Mar quarter of 1937 - William died age 71 in 1983 at South Eastern Surry

[02] 1914: Birth record – Edith H Eglinton at Croydon – Mar quarter (721)
Edith married Wilton T Charlton in the Mar quater of 1940 at Wandsworth Surrey

[03] 1915: Birth record – Alfred Eglinton at Croydon – Jun quarter (2a 690)
Alfred Appears to have married Marjorie H B Roy in the June quarter of 1942 at Bournemouth Dorset

[04] 1917: Birth record – Bertha Rose Eglinton at Croydon – Jun quarter (2a 548)
Bertha married William C Stonehouse in the Dec quarter of 1938 at London -

[05] 1920: Birth record - James S Eglinton at Croydon – Sep quarter (2a 793)

[06] 1921: Birth record - Robert L Eglinton at Croydon – Dec quarter (2a 611)
Robert appears to have died as an infant in the Dec quarter of 1921 at Croydon

[07] 1923: Birth record – Irene H Eglinton at Croydon – Jun quarter (2a 706)
Irene appears to have died as an infant in the Dec quarter of 1923 at Lambeth - needs checking

[08] 1926: Birth record – Sidney H Eglinton at Croydon – Mar quarter (2a 624)

[09] 1927: Birth record – Laurette E Eglinton at Croydon – Dec quarter (2a 574)

[10] 1931: Birth record – Kenneth A Eglinton at Croydon – Mar quarter (2a 574)

[11] 1935: Birth record – Jean M Eglinton at Surrey Mid E – Mar quarter (2a 200) * – ANCESTRAL LINE

[12] 1937: Birth record – Bryan M Eglinton at Surrey Mid E – Sep quarter (2a 212)
* This appears to be Joan MacPherson nee Eglinton

Is this Lawrence First World War record?  
First name(s): L E
Last name: Egleton
Service number: 28905, 1028787
Rank: Driver
Corps: Royal Field Artillery
Service record Soldier Number: 28905, Rank: Driver, Corps: Royal Field Artillery
Service record 2 Soldier Number: 1028787, Rank: Driver, Corps: Royal Field Artillery

1951: Death record Lawrence Edward Eglinton at Surry

1967: Dec 23 - Death record - Miriam Rose Eglinton at Cumberland House Mitcham, age 76 of Sally Road SW17
Widow of Lawrence Edward Eglinton, Factory worker (retired)
Informant: S H Eglinton, Son of 62 Glasford Street SW17

 

 

 

 

 

 

 
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